Trivium & Arch Enemy

Trivium & Arch Enemy

While She Sleeps, Fit For An Autopsy

Fri Nov 17 2017

5:30 pm

SOLD OUT

This event is all ages

Trivium
Trivium
Inspiration completes a circle throughout time. When the new generation understands the traditions of the forefathers, it can properly ascend. However, this ritual doesn't happen overnight. Time, patience, and endless work remain prerequisites—especially in music. Trivium—Matt Heafy [vocals, guitar], Corey Beaulieu [guitar] and Paolo Gregoletto [bass]—actually began building the blueprint for their seventh full-length album, Silence in the Snow [Roadrunner Records], back in 2007. They spent the next eight years diligently progressing and evolving, eventually becoming equipped with the wisdom to fully architect this body of work in 2015.
The genesis of the record's title track dates back to a 2007 run supporting Heaven and Hell in Japan, marking the first step of this journey. "When I watched them live, it was something that really spoke to me, especially the song 'Heaven and Hell'," recalls Matt. "I'd never heard metal summarized so well like that. Afterwards, I came up with 'Silence in the Snow.' We loved the song, but it just didn't fit with the music we were making at the time. The reason was, perhaps, we weren't ready for it. We foreshadowed our destiny back then, and we've finally grown into the song. It required massive musical growth, and we're ready now."
"Every time we would do a record, someone would bring up 'Silence in the Snow," continues Paolo. "It was in the back of our minds, but it wasn't the right time. It came out of that moment, seeing a classic band feel so modern and relevant with real passion. It fit with where we wanted to go today. We revisited the song, and it was the moment we got the clear cut vision for this album. It corralled all of our ideas together and sent us on the path. We wanted to hone in on making big metal anthems. Each track is distinct and matters with real dynamics. It's everything we wanted to do."
In order to achieve this goal, Trivium once again challenged themselves. They researched the bands who inspired their influences—Metallica, Pantera, Megadeth and Slayer —and immersed themselves in the work of Iron Maiden, Ozzy Osbourne, Dio, Judas Priest, Black Sabbath, and Rainbow.
"We definitely looked back to a lot of classic records and used them for inspiration," adds Paolo. "We knew we had to step up our game in the songwriting. We didn't want to simply write music, but put together a cohesive collection from start-to-finish. That's the real magic of those albums."
Simultaneously, after an introduction by M. Shadows from Avenged Sevenfold, Matt began taking vocal lessons regularly with renowned coach Ron Anderson. The frontman expanded his already rigorous schedule with intense Brazilian Jiu-jitsu training as well as guitar lessons with everything fueling this creative evolution. In order to capture the desired sound, they enlisted Michael "Elvis" Baskette [Slash, Alter Bridge] for production and Mat Madiro for drums and hit the studio in early 2015.
"Being a metal head with a great sense of songwriting and production, Elvis was the perfect fit," says Matt. "We've always had a balance of melody and technicality. He understood that and fostered its growth."
Sonically, the band also broke the mold. Rather, than mixing extremely loud, they nodded to the sonic quality of records such as Back In Black where the mix is quieter. When you turn it up, it doesn't become distorted. Josh Wilbur [Lamb of God, Gojira] got behind the board and helped them realize this.
"We wanted to make sure it wasn't too loud and crushed like many modern records are," Paolo goes on. "It had to be crystal clear and preserve the layers. That was the big thing we picked up from those classics. They sound so pristine. Making it so bold and big, the songs come across how they're meant to, and you want to turn it up."
Following the cinematic, orchestral opener "Snøfall" recorded by legendary Emperor visionary Ishahn, "Silence in the Snow" introduces the album with succinct searing guitar gallop and a sweeping refrain that's equally engaging and entrancing.
"It's a rally for positivity," exclaims Matt. "It's a battle cry. The lyrics didn't change much since 2007, and this kicked everything off."
At the same time, the first single "Until The World Goes Cold" begins with an ominous intro before adopting a hammering groove that subsides during the arena-size chorus.
"It's about the sacrifice we make," admits Matt. "Being in a band isn't just about working at your craft and attempting to be the best you can be musically. At times, you have to be away from your loved ones, comforts, and the things that essentially make you who you are. When you're striving for that dream, you can forget what you're searching for and start to give up. You have to realign and continue fighting for what you love and believe in."
"We wanted a song that was heavy at a slower pace," says Paolo. "It sounds even bigger that way. It has a really strong theme."
Meanwhile, "Pull Me From The Void" delivers a dose of vibrant vitriol through a twisting lead and expansive chant. "You should reach for impossible dreams and put everything into something you love," Matt exclaims. "If you don't, what's the point? I got inspired to do this at 12-years-old when I saw Metallica's Live Shit: Binge & Purge. I wanted to reach that level, and I'm not shying away from being honest about that."
"Blind Leading The Blind" pairs a lyrical solo with a slamming crescendo before turning on the harmonious declaration, "Save yourself."
"Sometimes, it seems like we keep perpetuating the ugliness that we have towards one another," he says. "I'm always hoping for a positive outcome. I'm using the song as a call-to-action in order for people to question the world around them, question the way things are, question who they treat others, and not just be content to live in the norm and do as they're told or expected. There are better ways to live life."
Trivium laid the foundation to reach this point with 2005's Ascendancy. Eventually, that seminal album would move over 500,000 copies worldwide. Throughout The Crusade [2006] and Shogun [2009], they would play alongside everybody from Black Sabbath to Iron Maiden and captivate crowds at Download Festival, OZZfest, and more. 2011's In Waves marked their highest chart entry on the Billboard Top 200, landing at #13, hitting #1 on Hard Rock chart, and selling 22,000 units first-week. Vengeance Falls would also go Top 15 in 2013 as the group went on to play the main stage at 2014's Mayhem Festival alongside Avenged Sevenfold and Korn. 2015 sees them co-headline with Tremonti, headline Bloodstock in Europe, and perform on the main stage at KNOTFEST.
In the end, Trivium arrive with an album that has a power to carry on that cycle of inspiration.
"Our band is about progression," concludes Paolo. "It's never been about a checklist to make a quintessential Trivium record. We've been talking about making this album for a while. It will lead us on to other things."
"On a surface level, I hope fans can have a good time listening to this," Matt leaves off. "For those who dig deeper, I hope they find solace in the music and they can be inspired to do something from the lyric. I said everything I wanted to say here. It's all on the album." — Rick Florino, July 2015
Arch Enemy
Arch Enemy
Melodic death metal band from Halmstad, Sweden, established in 1995 by brothers Michael and Christopher Amott.

Current lineup:
Michael Amott - Lead Guitar (1995 - )
Daniel Erlandsson - Drums (1996, 1998 -)
Sharlee D'Angelo - Bass (1998 - )
Alissa White-Gluz - Vocals (2014 - )
Jeff Loomis - Lead Guitar (2014 - )
While She Sleeps
While She Sleeps
While She Sleeps are a British metalcore band from Sheffield, England.
Fit For An Autopsy
Fit For An Autopsy
Corrupt politicians, manipulative mainstream media, government surveillance, mass shootings, clean water shortages, religious warfare, aggressive agribusiness, climate change, GMOs and a whole host of mind-numbing problems certainly make it feel like humankind is "going to hell in a hand basket," as they say. There may be nothing that can be done about it at this point. But at least we have a killer soundtrack.

Fit For An Autopsy's Hellbound is the perfect score with which to watch the flames rise. Punishing, unrelenting and alternately both heavy and dissonant, the New Jersey metal band's first album for Good Fight/eOne conjures visions of Nero vigorously attacking his fiddle, even as Rome was engulfed in fire all around him. Esteemed English actor Michael Caine delivers perhaps the best line in Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight" trilogy: "Some men just want to watch the world burn."

Death metal often chooses to deal in devils, demons and horror-movie inspired gore. "Deathcore" detours into broken relationships and introspective issues, much like its scene cousins in Metalcore and alt-rock. Fit For An Autopsy blaze their own path, opting to address the dirty, gritty and grimy reality of modern day life. There's no fantasy, no plaintive odes to lost love. This music is hell. These songs are Hellbound.

Scene queens, careerist cartoons and poseur-iffic hacks best step aside when confronted with the self-assured, art-for-art's-sake vibe of Fit For An Autopsy. As MetalSucks observed early on: "The band's brutal, glowering take on [deathcore] reminded [us] of the squandered potential of the genre. Hardcore grooves and swagger, when incorporated correctly, blend quite well with death metal."

On Hellbound, Fit For An Autopsy expand upon their commanding approach to an often maligned subgenre by synthesizing the rhythmic experimentalism of Gojira, the aggressive post-Noisecore of Converge, the esoteric and meditative tribalism of Isis, a virulent dose of the New Wave Of Swedish Death Metal (At The Gates, Dark Tranquility, early In Flames), the legendary progenitors of Floridian death metal (Death, Morbid Angel, Cannibal Corpse, Obituary) and the "deathcore" acts who offer actual proficiency in the genre (Suicide Silence, All Shall Perish, Whitechapel).

Each nuanced building block is meticulously assembled together to form a near-perfect modern metal masterpiece, all with the confident vibe of a group of people making the music they want to make for its own sake, trends and "hype" be damned.


There was justifiable reason to be excited about Fit For An Autopsy from the start. The rich pedigree of its core members foreshadowed the momentous music that was to come. Nate Johnson's stint fronting Through The Eyes Of The Dead resonated with many death metal diehards. Guitarist Will Putney is an accomplished metal producer, mixer, engineer and cowriter. Putney's fingerprints are all over currently relevant albums from Stray From The Path, Reign Supreme, Misery Signals, Vision of Disorder, Counterparts, For Today, Like Moths To Flames, Stray From The Path and more. Guitarist Patrick Sheridan is rightly well regarded for his work on the fretboard as well as with a tattoo machine. The rhythm section of bassist Shane Slade and Sick Drummer-approved Josean Orta is beyond formidable.

The earliest rumblings of Fit For An Autopsy emerged on a 2008 demo. The self-released Hell on Earth EP arrived the following year, eliciting interest from Guy Kozowyk, The Red Chord vocalist and Black Market Activities label honcho. Kozowyk released Fit For An Autopsy's devastating debut, The Process of Human Extermination, in 2011. Sputnik Music paid particular attention to Johnson's dominating presence. "The dude's a swamp creature," they wrote of his "absurd" (in a good way) delivery. "When you hear him scream, it's like, 'What the ---- was that?' You realize whatever it is would probably eat you if you ran into it in the woods."

The group's seething contempt for modern society is rivaled only by the sonic bombardment dropped upon the unsuspecting all over Hellbound, a record that is equal parts challenging and engaging. It's an album designed to make people feel uncomfortable, while at the same time, counter-intuitively soothed by its catharsis. Criminals, junkies and the systems that fail them; deadbeat parents; poisoned food; BS celebrities and false idols; they've all led humanity here. Hellbound draws a line in the sand. It's a declaration that even it's all going down the proverbial drain likeminded individuals can take some solace in the expression of shared rage.
Venue Information:
Summit Music Hall
1902 Blake St.
Denver, CO, 80208
http://thesummitmusichall.com/