Jan 14, 2013 - The Summit Music Hall
Door Time: 7:00 PM
Presented By: Channel 93.3 and Illegal Petes

Day: Monday, January 14, 2013
Door Time: 7:00 PM
Location: The Summit Music Hall - 1902 Blake St., Denver, CO.
Age: All Ages
Advance Ticket Price: $27.50
Day Of Show Price: $30
Buy Tickets

Take Action Tour
Take Action Tour 2013 benefiting It Gets Better Project

Featuring The Used, We Came As Romans, Crown The Empire, Mindflow

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The Used
The UsedVulnerability is commonly defined as “the inability to withstand the effects of a hostile environment.” It can be a time frame, when “defensive measures are reduced, compromised or lacking” or more personally, the soul-shaking moment when we stare in a mirror, finally seeing every last flaw. The answer is to somehow find the strength to heal, repair and improve, and for the Used, music is that salvation.

Turning personal adversity into art is the Used’s trademark, and the band’s fifth full-length, Vulnerable, was a record that simply had to be made. It marks a particular triumph for singer Bert McCracken, who is now reenergized after suffering a broken hand and elbow last year, falling from a stage in Orange County, Calif., and then spending four months getting surgery and recuperating. The experience partially birthed the title and concept of Vulnerable.
“Me feeling that vulnerability kind of sparked this creative fire inside of me,” says McCracken. “This record’s really about becoming more than just who you are, and allowing yourself that vulnerability to be a more powerful person. It’s a lot more positive than a lot of records we’ve written in the past. I think everyone could use some positivity nowadays.”

The Used—which also includes guitarist Quinn Allman, bassist Jeph Howard and drummer Dan Whitesides (who replaced original drummer Branden Steineckert in 2006)—formed in Orem, Utah in 2001, signing to Reprise Records that same year. Championed by producer and collaborator John Feldmann, the band issued their gold-certified Self-Titled debut in 2002, quickly cementing the Used as leaders among the post-hardcore elite, thanks in part to unforgettable singles like “Box Full of Sharp Objects,” “The Taste of Ink” and “Buried Myself Alive.” The band then released the CD/DVD combo Maybe Memories in 2003, now certified platinum, featuring B-sides, live cuts, demos and unreleased tracks, while still another gold record followed—2004’s In Love And Death—spawning singles “Take It Away,” “All That I’ve Got” and “I Caught Fire.”

After Steineckert’s 2006 departure, the band regrouped and issued 2007’s Lies For The Liars, hitting #5 on the Billboard Top 200, later naming Whitesides as their permanent drummer. The retooled outfit’s newfound solidarity led to 2009’s Artwork, which peaked at #10 on the Billboard Top 200, and featured Whitesides on the recordings for the first time. As if that weren’t enough to keep a band busy, since 2001 the Used has also destroyed countless stages the world over, touring with a who’s who of modern rock and heavy music contemporaries, and have been featured acts at major festivals like Warped Tour, Taste of Chaos, Ozzfest, Projekt Revolution and the UK’s Reading and Leeds festivals.

Still, after more than a decade’s worth of relentless touring and recording, the Used’s members recently needed to take some much-deserved time off. McCracken’s longtime writing partner Allman tied the knot, while Whitesides also exchanged vows and welcomed a baby into the world. McCracken spent much of his recovery in a haze of painkillers, then “awoke” to a creative limbo, in an entirely unfamiliar emotional space. At this point 2 years had passed and the band had completed numerous writing sessions that would last for 2 months at a time and in the end came out with more then 60 songs ideas. Thus when McCracken’s inspiration struck to record the songs, it came about in an entirely different fashion than the band’s previous method; with his drummer and guitarist temporarily unavailable, McCracken and Howard teamed up with Feldmann to take on the initial writing on their own while incorporating the 60 ideas they had previously worked on.

“We went in with Feldmann and wrote 11 songs and recorded them in 11 days. It was pretty magical,” says McCracken. “It was a bit more of the record I wanted to make. I think Quinn and Dan were stoked about that. I could go in one day and be like, ‘I really like the vibe of ‘Bombs Over Baghdad,’ so let’s start with a bass line and a drum beat like that.’ It was the most amazing time; the most fun I’ve had making a record.”
McCracken and Co. emerged from Feldmann’s studio toting the 12 tracks that comprise Vulnerable, the band’s first full-length since departing Warner Bros. Records. Without a label for the first time since their debut, the band opted to go indie, forming their Anger Music Group imprint, which will be distributed through Hopeless Records. The release of Vulnerable marks a new chapter in the band’s enduring career, at a time when the Used’s music is organically evolving, as well.

“I think [Vulnerable] is really new for us. There’s a lot of hip-hop influence, beats and drum and bass kind of stuff, but it’s also still a Used record, by all means,” explains McCracken. “Just like any other Used record, it’s a horse of many colors: There are a lot of soft and heavy sounds, there are a lot of brutal, sharp, bright sounds, and the tempos are anywhere from ultra-slow to super fast and heavy. There are a lot of different conceptual feelings on the record.”
Opening track and leadoff single “I Come Alive” sets the tone for the record from the start, with the sort of “down, but not out” sentiment McCracken has always channeled into  his lyrics. “The song, for me, is about falling down or hitting the ground; when things happen to you in life,” says McCracken. “That’s pretty much what ‘Box Full of Sharp Objects’ was about as well, on the first record. Taking a hit can be the most inspirational thing that can happen to you.”
The drive to overcome all obstacles, whether physical or emotional, also informs “Put Me Out,” which McCracken says centers on “the turmoil from a relationship you could have with anyone in your life; how people just kind of feel cheated and fucked over sometimes. Falling down and rising above that can make you a more powerful and stronger person.”

Album closer “Together Burning Bright” ends the journey on a romantic, yet appropriately darkly tinged note. McCracken says the song was heavily inspired by the Chuck Palahniuk book Damned, as well as the film Melancholia.

“Maybe the end of everything, so long as you can be with the person you love, everything will be alright, no matter what,” McCracken says. “It’s kind of a sappy, end of the world song.”

That may be true, but for now the Used’s world is far from ending. With Vulnerable slated for a March 26th, 2012 release, a world tour behind the record will follow, including appearances at Warped Tour, Soundwave in Australia, dates in Asia and Europe, and full headlining runs through the U.S., not to mention a DVD in the works to commemorate their decade-plus anniversary. The Used may have spent recent years nursing wounds and taking honeymoons, but 2012 and beyond will be all about bringing Vulnerability, and its uplifting message, to the masses.

“This record is for all those people who weren’t the coolest people around. We never were. This record’s for kids like us, who just love music, because it saves their lives every day,” McCracken says. “At the end of the day, I’m the only one who has to live and die with myself. I want to make it a good one for me. I only have one life to live.”
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We Came As Romans
We Came As Romans"To Plant A Seed embodies a really strong message that we've always held as a band and that's the simple fact to love others and to love in general," explained Joshua Moore, guitarist and main songwriter for We Came As Romans. "Hopefully this album will plant a seed, or idea, of love into people's minds. The whole concept is that hopefully the practice of loving other people will grow."

These words, spoken by Moore in 2009 proved to only be the beginning for the Michigan-based band. Since their 2005 inception, We Came As Romans has successfully delivered a refreshing lyrical perspective that focuses on spreading the positive message of being good people and loving one another. Moore states, "Love doesn't have an argument; everyone wants to love and be loved. We decided if we were going to be a band, we needed to have meaning behind it. And I don't think there is any greater meaning than to keep on spreading the idea and concept of love."

The highly anticipated follow-up album, Understanding What We've Grown To Be, was released in North America on September 13th through Equal Vision Records, debuting at No. 20 on the Billboard Current Top 200 Chart. Additional Billboard Chart placements include: #5 on Top Hard Music, #7 Independent, #10 Top Current Rock, #15 Current Digital, and #21 on the Top 200 Album Chart.

The album was released internationally in Australia, New Zealand (via We Are Unified) Europe, Russia, South Africa (via Nuclear Blast), and Japan (via Triple Vision).

For their sophomore album, We Came As Romans returned to Foundation Recording Studio with their longtime friend and producer, Joey Sturgis [The Devil Wears Prada, Asking Alexandria, Attack Attack!]. The new material carries the band's signature sound of intricate guitar riffs, both mosh-worthy and melodic breakdowns, and the flawless intertwining of dual vocals from David Stephens and Kyle Pavone.

Musically and lyrically, Understanding What We've Grown To Be holds a much darker tone than their previous release, To Plant A Seed. While still maintaining the band's overall theme of positivity and brotherhood, the new material takes on a more straightforward approach to life's struggles and the challenges of growing up. The juxtaposition of brutal breakdowns and chugging minor arpeggios with Pavone's smooth croons, Stephens' fierce and gut-wrenching screams, and crisp electronic elements creates an in-your-face sound that is distinctly We Came As Romans.

In the past year, We Came As Romans performed on the massive Gamechangers Tour with hardcore heavyweights A Day To Remember and Bring Me The Horizon, headlined the 2011 Motel 6 Rock Yourself To Sleep Tour (which sold out over 30 of the dates), supported on the 2010 Scream It Like You Mean It Tour with headliners Silverstein. They also headed overseas with the likes of Megadeth, NOFX, Parkway Drive, GWAR, Suicide Silence, August Burns Red and more, touring once in Australia (No Sleep Til) and twice in Europe (Never Say Die Tour and headlining the 2011 European Scream It Like You Mean It Tour). This summer, We Came As Romans performed on the entirety of the 2011 Vans Warped Tour and appeared on the cover of both Alternative Press and Substream Magazine's Warped Tour issues.

We Came As Romans debut full-length album, To Plant A Seed, has already sold nearly 80,000 copies since its release on November 3, 2009. In January 2011, We Came As Romans released a deluxe edition of To Plant A Seed featuring a new single, "To Move On Is To Grow", as well as a 38-minute DVD of live performances, exclusive interviews, and their new music video for "To Move On Is To Grow."

Through their relentless enthusiasm and dedication to touring, We Came As Romans have proven their ability to win over any and every audience by pouring their hearts out on stage and take "giving 100%" to the next level.

"When kids come to see us, they already know what the songs sound like and know what they're going to hear, it's what they want to see that matters. We seriously give everything into making every show the most heartfelt and real show that we can give," says Moore. "I want people to enjoy the music for what it is and realize the meaning; hopefully it's something that hits close to home."
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Crown The Empire
Crown The EmpireIt’s true: A picture does paint a thousand words, even if the artist uses sound—rather than pigment and pencil—to create that image. For the Dallas-based outfit Crown The Empire, that means making music on a level rarely seen nowadays, combining visual aesthetics, theatrical sonic textures and thought-provoking lyrics for an audio experience that takes the listener on a wild ride of epic proportions. And they’re just getting started.

Armed with The Fallout, the band’s recent full-length debut, Crown The Empire are bringing a high-energy, visually stimulating and thematically engaging side to post-hardcore, that’s already created a massive buzz for the still-embryonic outfit. Set amid a charred post-apocalyptic landscape, listening to The Fallout is an unforgettable excursion into the imaginations of its makers.

“We wanted this music to constantly make you feel what we were feeling and what we were writing about, whether it’s the softer or heavier songs,” explains Andy Leo, “We were trying to make it the sound of what you should be feeling; if you were watching a movie, this would be the score.”

Crown The Empire—which includes vocalists Andy Leo and David Escamilla, guitarists Brandon Hoover and Bennett Vogelman, drummer Brent Taddie and bassist Hayden Tree—formed in Dallas, Tex. in 2011, after Leo connected with Hoover and Tree, with the goal of starting a new project. Taddie and Vogelman—both discovered through videos of them playing covers on YouTube—joined later that year, and those early efforts led to the November 2011 EP Limitless. Then in March 2012 second vocalist Escamilla was added to the fold, solidifying the lineup as it currently exists, giving birth to the band’s full-length debut, The Fallout, released November 2012. Over the past two years the band has toured both nationally and abroad, with slots on the recent Our Last Night run, the 2013 Take Action tour with The Used, select dates with Falling In Reverse, and a U.K. run with Pierce the Veil. Crown The Empire were also recently featured on the cover of Alternative Press’ annual “Bands You Need To Know” issue.

Sequestered in Michigan with famed producer Joey Sturgis (The Devil Wears Prada, We Came As Romans, Miss May I), the band spent August and September of 2012 laying down the intricate compositions that comprise The Fallout, recording well through the night on most evenings. A painstaking process by all accounts, Leo says he spent six weeks living in Sturgis’ basement, subsisting on ramen noodles and microwave meals, but couldn’t be happier with the results. Sturgis is known for both his sparkling sonic touch, as well as his knack for adding cinematic elements to the music, and both qualities help make The Fallout shine.

“Joey didn’t change much song structure-wise; he mainly made it sound good,” explains Leo. “We have a more defined approach of what we want an album to sound like, and Joey is the perfect producer for that. We wanted all this real sound, and he captured that.”

“What would be left behind at the end of the world? Metal, gears…The bass booms on the record have explosions in them, and glass breaking, and gears turning over, sounding like a broken-down industrial park,” says drummer Brent Taddie, regarding the album’s end-of-world vibe. “There would be power grids, wires, steel left behind. All those explosions, the heavy parts, the aggressive vocals are breaking down the end of the world. The strings, the clean vocals are kind of the harmony coming through, but the guitar, the kick drum, the explosions—that’s supposed to be the destruction…the end of the world.”

The dark and cinematic soundscape that pervades The Fallout reflects the album’s post-apocalyptic theme, which actually began as a metaphor for a failed relationship. Leo says the idea came about after a member had broken up with a girlfriend, later realizing the full impact of his decision. Using some poetic license, the split was transformed into a global doomsday-inducing event.

“Her friends kept saying, ‘You ended her world,’” Leo remembers. “I was sitting around with a Brandon, telling him about it, and we decided, what if it did actually end the world with that breakup? From there, we started building this idea of the end of the world, and built a setting for it around this theme of being alone and faced against people. It all spawned out of a breakup, but it turned into this huge, massive world.”

Perhaps no track on The Fallout conveys this central them more than “Memories Of A Broken Heart.” Although one of the softer moments on the album, Leo says the lyrics are especially impactful in the record’s overall context. “That song has the perfect syllogism for the end of the world and the breakup. It talks about both,” says Leo. “I was outside and thought of the idea for the lyric ‘I stand on the ash of all I’ve ever loved.’ I was so stoked, because we’d already come up with the idea for the end of the world being a breakup. That line was about the ashes of a building, or the ashes of relationships.”

To date the band has released two music videos to accompany the The Fallout’s release: a two-part series for the tracks “Oh Catastrophe” and the title track. The visual story arc in the two videos conveys a tale of star-crossed lovers separated by differences in ideology, rather than being united by love.

“We came up with this idea of a weird Romeo and Juliet thing, with people not making the tough choices and arguing over things like religion, and all these things that at the end of the world wouldn’t matter. Somebody’s gonna be wrong,” says Leo. “I was thinking of how stubborn someone could be to see the end of the world not ending the way their book said it would, and still trying to argue. In the video, there’s this idea that love—this couple—could disband the army that was trying to keep them apart. They couldn’t see the love that was in front of them.”

With The Fallout still fresh, Crown The Empire have an extensive tour itinerary planned for the coming months, with a headlining run booked for spring and a slot on the Rise Records Tour (alongside labelmates Like Moths To Flames), then a full slate of dates on this summer’s Vans Warped Tour. Leo says as the group continue to build momentum, they plan on making their live shows progressively more elaborate and cinematic, further bringing Crown The Empire’s evocative brand of music to life.

“We’re constantly talking about new backdrops, new cabinets, new gear…how we can sound better. Eventually we want to be talking about what kind of rigs can we build on stage, what kind of lighting can we bring, what sort of pyrotechnics. That’s a huge part we love, that a lot of the bands have lost out on: the idea of a big festival for your eyes and not just your ears,” says Leo. “I think the shows will take a whole new level in the future. They’re always going to just get bigger.”

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Mindflow